Philosophy Ain’t What It Used to Be. Thank Goodness.

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I would give an awful lot for us to not be in the situation we’re currently in. I have no wish to see children out of school, people out of work, and our physical well-being threatened. Like many people, I’m doing what I can to help, and I wake up every morning wishing I had the smarts or the ability to make it all just go away. I’m profoundly sorry this is all happening, and I’m even more sorry that there are so many suffering because of it.

But I’m not sorry that so much will change because of it. I’m not at all upset at the idea of a “new normal”, although I’ve never been a fan of the word “normal” per se. Quite a lot of stuff hasn’t really worked for a long time, and we’ve become pretty comfortable with it not working. Long before we were told to stay put in our houses and wash our hands thoroughly and frequently, there were a lot of things that were long overdue for an overhaul.

And philosophy was one of them.

Perhaps the fact that philosophy is thousands (or tens of thousands) of years old somewhat excuses the fact that it got kind of…stuck. History is lousy with stories of people doing things out of habit, because they were comfortable with status quo. But philosophy is supposed to be better than that. Doing things a certain way, for a prolonged period of time, “just because” is considered a major philosophical no-no. Philosophers are supposed to bristle at the notions of comfort and habit. We’re supposed to relish change, or at least be open to it.

So, here are handful of things about philosophy that I hope to see re-envisioned, as everything else is likely to be in the not-so-distant future:

  • It needs to be accessible to everyone, because now more than ever, everyone needs it. I know philosophers say that it’s for everyone, but a lot of the time, that’s just lip service. We don’t always communicate and share things in a way that everyone can understand. We don’t go out of our way to include everyone. We don’t always embrace philosophical thinking in children, and we don’t bolster it in adults. Philosophy empowers, consoles, enlightens, connects, and everyone needs that, especially now.
  • It needs to be practical and applied. I’m all for ideas-for-the-sake-of-ideas…sometimes. That kind of approach has its place and its value, but it’s just not enough anymore. I’d go so far as to challenge any philosopher, studying in any branch of philosophy, to find an everyday use for whatever they happen to study. Go out on your front porch, watch strangers pass by on the street, and ask yourself “How would this make their lives better, right now?” If philosophy can’t help solve problems, then what are we doing?
  • We need to start looking for it everywhere. It’s not like it wasn’t already in movies, books, cartoons, music, food, theatre, sports, and all over the place. Philosophy needs to become just another part of our culture, something we just do all the time, in every part of our lives. We need to point out what’s there, and stir it into all kinds of new things too.
  • Philosophy needs to make friends with tech and new media. There are some thinkers who’ve made the leap, and who are constantly experimenting with ways to make dialogue and inquiry work online. There has also been a whole lot of resistance. Getting philosophy to go digital isn’t an easy ask, by any means, but our choice at this point is do it through tech, or do it alone. Beyond this, there’s a lot that philosophy can contribute to the tech world, and to digital literacy.
  • We need to take pleasure in asking questions, instead of being afraid of them. A non-trivial part of the mess we’re in right now stems from the fact that humans don’t turn over enough proverbial rocks, because we’re afraid of what might scurry out from under them. As philosophers, we have to model the joy of thinking, and nurture it in others.

There’s been a lot of talk lately about how COVID19 has effectively sent the lot of us to our rooms, so that we can think about what we’ve done. Anyone who has the privilege of being able to shelter in place probably has a lot more time to do just that- think. What an incredible wasted opportunity this would be if we didn’t take advantage of that, to sharpen our skills and re-evaluate the way we’ve been unjustifiably resting on our laurels, to come up with solutions needed by those who aren’t so lucky, so privileged.

For as long as I can remember, philosophers have been asking why we don’t get the attention and respect we deserve. We’ve bemoaned the fact that we aren’t always seen as useful or relevant. Well my friends, this “‘new normal” that will supposedly be waiting for us when the dust settles isn’t going to magically appear on its own. It’s going to require deep thinking, the asking of difficult and uncomfortable questions, the very things that philosophers claim to specialize in. This isn’t the opportunity we were planning (or hoping) for, but it is an opportunity, nonetheless, to help ourselves grow as thinkers and as a community, but also to help others find their sea legs in the midst of a terrible storm.

Anyone up for a change?

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